«

»

Aug 10

Learn British English Free (video): favourite idioms by Studio Cambridge

Favourite idioms by Studio Cambridge. Video produced by Mark Godunov.
Studio Cambridge website.

Understanding English Idioms
By Studio Cambridge on 19th July 2017
Idioms, we English speakers love them! They have the ability to perfectly sum up our thoughts or feelings on any giving topic. They can be described as a group of words which have a meaning which isn’t obvious from looking at the individual words. They also often rely on analogies and metaphors which may not be obvious if English is not your first language. So we thought we would highlight a few as you may encounter a few when you hit English speaking soil.

Sit tight – stay where you are and wait until you something happens.
Example: The receptionist asked Laila to sit tight and wait for her manager as she was talking to someone.
Costs an arm and a leg – If it costs an arm and a leg, it’s very expensive. Like, really expensive.
Example: Jim loves that house but it would cost him an arm and a leg to buy.
Face the music- It simply means to “face reality” or to deal with a real situation.
Example: Jamie will have to face the music for skipping class. (He will be punished.)
Break a leg – Break a leg actually means good luck! So next time you hear your teacher say ‘break a leg on the exam’ they don’t actually want you to get hurt. On the contrary, they want you to do well!
Example: My dad told me to break a leg at my football match.
Hit the books –Hit the books means to study.
Example: The teacher told us to hit the books as the final is going to be a hard one.
When pigs fly – No, we don’t think that pigs can actually fly. This idiom refers to an event or action that will never happen!
Example: You’ll pass an exam without studying when pigs fly.
Sit on the fence – When you cannot or don’t want to make a decision.
Example: We’re not sure why he is sitting on the fence on this issue; it’s frustrating for everyone involved.

Leave a Reply