Category Archive: Vocabulary

Mar 31

English Egg Idioms for Easter! (visual lesson)

ris wishes you happy Easter with these English idioms with ‘egg':

Egg Idioms JPEG

Jan 28

Learn British English Free (video): Easy Maths and Numbers

Chris presents this special lesson about easy maths and numbers in British English.
+ add / plus
– minus / take away
x times
÷ divided by
= equals / is
2 + 16 = 18 (two add sixteen equals eighteen)
12 + 28 = 40 (twelve plus twenty-eight is forty)
13 – 6 = 7 (thirteen minus six equals seven)
77 – 33 = 44 (seventy-seven take away thirty-three is forty-four)
3 x 7 = 21 (three times seven equals twenty-one)
8 x 10 = 80 (eight times ten is eighty)
36 ÷ 12 = 3 (thirty-six divided by twelve equals three)

via YouTube.

Dec 27

Learn British English Free video: Words of the Year 2017

Chris presents the words of the year. What’s yours?
http://www.learnbritishenglish.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/35-Words-of-the-Year-2017-Chris-PDF.pdf

English Words of the Year 2017

Collins Dictionary Word of the year: fake news
‘There’s so much fake news these days.’

Also:
Corbynmania
Echo chamber
Fidget spinner
Gender-fluid
Gig economy
Insta (adjective)
‘That’s a great insta photo.’
Unicorn
‘The new app, released last year, has proved the basis for a unicorn.’

Cambridge Dictionary word of the year: ‘populism’ (also ‘inauguration’)

Oxford Dictionaries: ‘youthquake’ (also ‘Antifa’ and ‘unicorn’)

Nov 25

Learn English vocabulary: cricket wicket / stumps (the Ashes)

This winter, England are playing Australia in the famous cricket series called the Ashes. In case you are interested, this is useful vocabulary about the wicket (or stumps):

Cricket Wicket JPEG

Sep 02

English Idioms and Collocations with ‘hit’

English idioms and collocations with ‘hit’:

hit a nerve

hit on someone

hit rock bottom

hit someone for six

hit the books

hit the ceiling

hit the ground running

hit the hay

hit the headlines

hit the nail on the head

smash hit (song)

Hit Collocations JPEG

Aug 20

Learn British English Free (geography video): counties and pronunciation

Chris presents this free pronunciation lesson about the names of counties (regions) in England. Please use captions / subtitles.

Aug 11

British Humour and Drinking Alcohol Vocabulary

British Humour and Alcohol Vocab. (please watch video below)
Fairly merry = slightly drunk
Inebriated = drunk
Absolutely plastered = very drunk
Completely newscasted = very, very, very drunk!

Also ‘footless’ = very drunk (NEW June 2017)

 

 

Aug 10

Learn British English Free (video): favourite idioms by Studio Cambridge

Favourite idioms by Studio Cambridge. Video produced by Mark Godunov.
Studio Cambridge website.

Understanding English Idioms
By Studio Cambridge on 19th July 2017
Idioms, we English speakers love them! They have the ability to perfectly sum up our thoughts or feelings on any giving topic. They can be described as a group of words which have a meaning which isn’t obvious from looking at the individual words. They also often rely on analogies and metaphors which may not be obvious if English is not your first language. So we thought we would highlight a few as you may encounter a few when you hit English speaking soil.

Sit tight – stay where you are and wait until you something happens.
Example: The receptionist asked Laila to sit tight and wait for her manager as she was talking to someone.
Costs an arm and a leg – If it costs an arm and a leg, it’s very expensive. Like, really expensive.
Example: Jim loves that house but it would cost him an arm and a leg to buy.
Face the music- It simply means to “face reality” or to deal with a real situation.
Example: Jamie will have to face the music for skipping class. (He will be punished.)
Break a leg – Break a leg actually means good luck! So next time you hear your teacher say ‘break a leg on the exam’ they don’t actually want you to get hurt. On the contrary, they want you to do well!
Example: My dad told me to break a leg at my football match.
Hit the books –Hit the books means to study.
Example: The teacher told us to hit the books as the final is going to be a hard one.
When pigs fly – No, we don’t think that pigs can actually fly. This idiom refers to an event or action that will never happen!
Example: You’ll pass an exam without studying when pigs fly.
Sit on the fence – When you cannot or don’t want to make a decision.
Example: We’re not sure why he is sitting on the fence on this issue; it’s frustrating for everyone involved.

Jul 16

Learn British English Free (video lesson): more useful objects at home

Chris presents another free lesson about vocabulary for useful objects at home:
Coat hanger
Clothes peg or peg
Toilet roll and toilet paper
Ruler
Calculator
Highlighter pen
Stationery
Kettle
Alarm clock
(Computer) mouse
Mobile (phone) [British English; not cell phone]
Smart phone

Jul 01

British English Listening Practice: Brexit

Listen to this short news report on BBC Radio 5 Live about Brexit (Britain leaving the European Union).

  1. What is the name of the UK Prime Minister?
  2. What is the name of the Brexit Secretary?
  3. What is the name of the Brexit Secretary’s ex-Chief of Staff?
  4. What particular element of the EU do they disagree on?

When you have finished, please check your answers here.

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