Category Archive: Free Videos

Mar 15

Learn British English Free (video): Coronavirus / COVID-19 Blog

Chris reads this Cambridge Dictionary blog entry on the Coronavirus – COVID-19 vocabulary and collocations for Learn British English Free on YouTube:

Mar 08

Learn British English Free (YouTube video): Special Pronunciation Lesson

In this special pronunciation lesson on Learn British English Free on YouTube, Chris practises the pronunciation of these ten words for T. Chen:

  1. Girl
  2. World
  3. Sixth
  4. Environment
  5. Worcestershire
  6. Murderer
  7. Isthmus
  8. Squirrel
  9. Receipt
  10. Chocolate

Via YouTube:

 

Mar 07

Learn British English Free (video): Coronavirus Vocabulary: endemic; epidemic; pandemic

This is the Learn British English Free video lesson by Chris where he explains more about the Coronavirus – COVID-19 – and the terms endemic, epidemic and pandemic. Via YouTube:

Mar 01

Learn British English Grammar Free (video): Second Conditional with examples

This is a Learn British English Free lesson where Chris explains the concept and structure of the second conditional in English with examples.

“If I were you, I would (I’d) ask her out.”

 

Structure: If + subject + verb past tense…, subject + would + verb bare infinitive…

Or: Subject + would + verb bare infinitive… + if + subject + verb past tense…

(I would ask her out if I were you.)

 

Time: present or future (hypothetical)

Probability: extremely small

First conditional: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll stay inside (50% chance)

Second conditional: I’d stay inside if it were to snow tomorrow (very small chance)

 

Question for students: “If you were stuck on a desert island, what five things would you choose to have?”

“If I were stuck on a desert island, I would choose…”

Via YouTube:

Feb 27

Learn British English Free (video): Help with Common Mistakes

In this Learn British English Free lesson, Chris explains some useful expressions and how to avoid common mistakes in the UK.

“Her daughter is six or seven years old.”

“I last saw him 30 or 40 years ago.”

“The flight could take nine or ten hours.”

Compound Adjectives for Duration

The drive takes four hours = it’s a four-hour drive

The appointment takes 15 minutes = it’s a 15-minute appointment

“Every now and then.”

“The defence is at sixes and sevens back there!”

Via YouTube:

 

Feb 25

Learn British English Free (video): English Football (not “soccer”)

In this FREE British English lesson, Chris explains English football and the Premier League, as well as pronunciation practice: Football (not soccer, please): 11 players

Officials: referee; two linesmen; fourth official;

VAR (Video Assistant Referee) VAR: clear and obvious errors – penalties; goals; handballs; offsides??

Premier League Championship League One League Two FA Cup League Cup Champions League Europa League

Nicknames Manchester United = the Red Devils Arsenal = the Gunners

Stadium Names Chelsea’s stadium is Stamford Bridge Liverpool’s stadium is Anfield

Teams in the English Premier League – pronunciation practice

Via YouTube:

Feb 16

Learn British English Verbs Free (video): “look for” and “search (for)”

This is a Learn British English Free lesson in which Chris explains the difference between “look for” and “search (for)”.

Look for – more natural, common and informal (always with “for”)

“I can’t find my car keys.” “Let’s look for them then”.

“What are you looking for?”

Search (for) – more formal (e.g. police)

“The police are urgently searching for the suspect.”

“The police were searching the area last night.” (verb without “for”)

“The police conducted a thorough search of the property.” (noun)

Via YouTube:

Feb 10

Free English Grammar Lesson (video): Double Negatives with examples

This is a Learn British English Free (YouTube) lesson where Chris explains not to use double negatives in English and how to avoid it with examples:

“I don’t know nothing.” – WRONG

“I don’t know anything.” – CORRECT

“He didn’t see no-one like that in the pub.” – WRONG

“He didn’t see anyone like that in the pub.” – CORRECT

“We don’t have no spuds left in the kitchen!” – WRONG

“We don’t have any spuds left in the kitchen!” – CORRECT

“I don’t want no tea, thank you.” – WRONG

“I don’t want any tea, thank you.” – GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT BUT STILL WRONG

Via YouTube:

 

Feb 05

Learn British English Free (video): “Grand” and “Smashing” (Key Vocabulary)

This is a Learn British English Free lesson in which Chris explains the British use of words “grand” and “smashing” with examples.

Grand = £1,000

“My motorbike set me back four grand.” (no “s” in the plural)

“He’s on 28 grand a year.”

 

Grand = very good; fine

“How are you?” “I’m grand, thank you.”

“Would you like some milk and sugar in your tea?” “Aye – that would be grand, ta.”

 

Grand = smashing = very positive adjective / exclamation:

 

Smashing! (before a noun or standing alone)

 

Via YouTube:

Feb 01

Learn British English Free (video): “Phub” and “Phubbing” slang

Chris explains slang term “phub”: to ignore (snub) someone by using your phone. Phone + snub = phub. Free English lesson. “I took her to a fancy restaurant but she phubbed me all evening.” “I took her to a fancy restaurant but she spent the whole evening phubbing me.” “Phubbing isn’t the best social activity.” (noun)

“Phubbing” in the Cambridge Dictionary online.

Via YouTube:

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