Aug 30

Learn English Free: English Collocations with “Time” (visual)

English collocations with “time”:
Time Collocations JPEG

Aug 28

Learn British English Free: Common Acronyms (video lesson)

Definition of an acronym: “an abbreviation formed from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word”

(The)UK – (The) United Kingdom

BBC – British Broadcasting Corporation

ITV – Independent Television

NHS – National Health Service

DWP – Department for Work and Pensions

HMRC – Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs

DBS check – Disclosure and Barring Service

GCSE – General Certificate of Secondary Education

NI – National Insurance (number)

GMT – Greenwich Mean Time

BST – British Summer Time (GMT + 1)

 

Aug 28

Learn English Free: Collocations with “Get”

English collocations are “a word or phrase that is often used with another word or phrase, in a way that sounds correct to people who have spoken the language all their lives, but might not be expected from the meaning”.

Get drunk

Get busy

Get married

Get divorced

Get lost

Get upset

Get permission

Get Collocations JPEG

Aug 27

Learn English Free: Collocations with “Have”

English collocations are “a word or phrase that is often used with another word or phrase, in a way that sounds correct to people who have spoken the language all their lives, but might not be expected from the meaning”.

Have a bath

Have a drink

Have a bite to eat

Have a good time

Have a relationship

Have a think

Have a wander

Have Collocations JPEG

Aug 24

He or She vs They – ‘Singular They’ (free video lesson)

He or She vs They – ‘Singular They’

 

Aug 21

English Idioms: Gold Idioms

On the last day of the 2016 Olympic Games, here are some English idioms using the colour gold:

 

Gold Idioms JPEG

Aug 21

English Idioms: Silver Idioms

To mark the end of the Olympic Games, please see below for some English idioms using the colour silver:

 

Silver Idioms JPEG:

Aug 14

11 Idioms only Brits Understand (free video lesson)

11 Idioms only Brits Understand (click to read)

 

Aug 10

American vs British Pronunciation: 7 words to look out for (free video)

Via Oxford Dictionaries Blog:

Niche: /nɪtʃ/ (U.S.)

/niːʃ/ (British)

 

Vase: /vās/ (U.S.)

/vɑːz/ (British)

 

Privacy: /ˈprʌɪvəsi/ (U.S.)

/ˈprɪvəsi/ (British)

 

Buoy: /ˈbo͞oē/ (U.S.)

/bɔɪ/ (British)

 

Zebra: /ˈzēbrə/ (U.S.)

/ˈzɛbrə/ (British)

 

Route: /rout/ (U.S.)

/ruːt/ (British)

 

Clique: /klik/ (U.S.)

/klēk/ (British)

 

Aug 06

Look up to someone / Look down on someone (Phrasal verbs)

Look up to someone

To respect and admire (someone)

“I’ve always looked up to my younger brother.”

“The students really look up to their teacher.”

 

Look down on someone

To think of or treat (someone or something) as unimportant or not worthy of respect

“The other children looked down on her because her parents were poor.”

“He looked down on all of his friends because he considered them less successful than he was.”

 

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